<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> GPAGO: Grooming Your Greyhound

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Page updated 11/26/2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


7. Home Alone

Up until now, your Greyhound has led a very different life than that of a house pet. Even the most simple, common things in our everyday life can be completely foreign to a Greyhound and a little intimidating.A little patience and a lot of love will help you and your new pet make the adjustment. Here are a couple suggestions to remember when leaving your Greyhound home alone.

The Greyhound's Crate

A big asset in this initial adjustment period is the crate. This portable cage provides the security your dog needs as well as protecting both the dog and your house from any damage. 

Your pet is used to having his own crate in the kennel. Using a crate is not cruel. It provides the sense of security your dog needs. All he/she needs is a nice bone and a warm comfortable place with a washable blanket to nap the day away. A radio or TV will provide soothing background noises.

For the first few days, leave the crate door open when you are present. Your Greyhound may be frightened by too much activity, noise, or strange surroundings and take comfort in the crate’s safety.

Separation Anxiety

One of the hardest things for your Greyhound to adjust to will be loneliness. This dog has lived its entire life with either littermates or kennelmates and people coming and going most of the day.

Before you leave your dog for an extended period, you should practice leaving for short time intervals to develop trust that you will return. Build up to longer period of separation.

 The Crate Game or First Separation

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