Many people love Greyhounds for their friendly, easygoing nature. However, these dogs have some unusual traits; one of them is having a lower activity level than many others dogs.

Are Greyhounds lazy?

Although it may seem as though these dogs are the most sedentary dogs ever, this is not a fair assessment. Every breed has different mental, physical, and emotional needs, and Greyhounds are no exception.

Read on to learn more about why many think Grehounds are lazy and what you need to know about these dogs and their activity levels. You’ll learn more about what motivates these dogs and how to keep them happy.

Why Do Greyhounds Have a Reputation for Laziness?

Many are surprised that Greyhounds have a lazy reputation. These dogs are one of the fastest animals in the world, not to mention the fastest dog breed.

Greyhounds can run fast when the occasion calls, but they aren’t an athletic breed in general. As much as these dogs love a good run, they also love to sleep. For the most part, these hounds are easily described as couch potatoes.

Many owners joke that these dogs spend more time on the couch than off. You might find your dog being on the sofa surprising if you expect a consistently high energy level. If these dogs like to run, why do they sleep so much?

These dogs can easily sleep as much as 20 hours a day. These long sleeping times are an essential energy conservation method for when they decide to run.

These dogs’ bursts of speed account for relatively little of their lives.

Ironically, Greyhounds have a lower energy level than many smaller breeds. The dogs’ reputations are easy to describe as being placid.

Significantly few things can upset or anger these dogs, making them versatile family dogs.

One of the most important things to remember is each dog’s individualism. Although most of these dogs are calmer, some might be more energetic.

You might need to adjust your dog’s exercise routine depending on the overall energy level.

Are Greyhounds Good Exercise Buddies for Their Owners?

Greyhounds can run at incredible speeds. However, does their speed make them exercise buddies for owners who love to jog or run?

You might be surprised. These dogs like to run, but only on their terms. Your daily jog might not fit the bill.

Despite running up to 40 mph, these dogs don’t consistently run. The breed’s original purpose explains the lower energy level.

Initially, these dogs were bred as sight hounds that hunted rabbits and similar small game.

Unlike scent hounds bred to track game, these dogs chased down and captured their prey. Running in short bursts was necessary, rather than running over distances.

If you enjoy spending time with your dog outside, you might consider using toys that simulate rabbits or a small game for the dog to chase. After all, racing Greyhounds chase after mechanical rabbits very willingly.

Allowing your dog to take full advantage of her instincts as a hunter is the best way to make her happy.

Although you might be disappointed at not having your dog as a jogging buddy, you’ll enjoy seeing how happy she is at play.

When Are Greyhounds More Likely to Have a Lot of Energy?

Greyhounds are likely to have a lot of energy when they are puppies or young dogs. Puppies have a lot of energy to burn because of their metabolism.

The first year is critical for these dogs to learn appropriate boundaries.

Introducing these dogs to fenced areas where they can run and burn off energy is a good idea. A dog park can be an excellent choice if you have one in your area.

These dogs will calm down as they mature, but you’ll need time to allow this to happen.

Another situation where these dogs are highly energetic is when they are untrained, not stimulated enough, and left alone too much. Dogs in these circumstances will often get bored and be destructive.

When dogs behave this way out of boredom, this is not a good way for the dogs to use their energy.

You’ll need to work on providing other ways for your dog to amuse herself. A helpful thing to remember is that tired dogs are good.

You might need to make the effort to take your dog out a little more often if she is showing signs of boredom.

The occasional playdate with another large dog can be helpful, especially if the dog is more high-energy.

Are Greyhounds Good for Apartment Living?

Greyhounds are often considered among the best breeds for living in an apartment.

These dogs needing exercise in shorter bursts help make the hounds popular for living in apartments, despite the larger size.

Greyhounds also shed very little and are not barkers, two traits that appeal to apartment residents.

If you take your dog on a daily jog or walk, you’ll be able to satisfy your dog’s needs.

Although your hound won’t enjoy ultra-long walks or runs, she will likely look forward to her daily trip outside your apartment.

Although not the most energetic dogs, Greyhounds are sociable. Your dog will enjoy getting out and meeting new people, especially kids.

These dogs will likely want to make friends with other dogs they encounter on the way.

How Does Sleeping So Much Benefit Greyhounds?

There are several reasons that sleeping so much is beneficial for Greyhounds. Some of these reasons are health-related, while others benefit the dog mentally.

Although these dogs have been bred for speed, most are now pets. There are fewer stressors and less stimulation than there would be for working hunting dogs.

These dogs are less active, with a reduced need for a high activity level.

When dogs spend time napping, they can retain what they have learned more easily.

The brain receives positive stimulation during sleep after the dog has learned a task. A result is better performance of critical tasks.

Despite the time that these dogs spend sleeping, much of that sleep time involves naps.

The percentage of time that dogs spend in REM sleep is as slow as 10%. By napping more often, these dogs can get more of the restorative sleep they require.

Dogs’ bodies can repair themselves during sleep. One of the most important ways dogs restore their bodies through rest is by strengthening their immune systems.

The stronger the immune system, the less likely the dog is to get sick.

Keeping a regular schedule will help you better coordinate your dog’s sleep schedule.

Taking your dog for a walk and feeding her a few hours before bedtime will help her wind down more quickly. A final potty break will help your dog rest.

A bed for your dog in the correct size can help her rest more comfortably. The best choices offer a sheet of memory foam.

If you invest in a bolster and blanket, both of these can help your dog feel more comfortable with her bed.

Keeping your dog’s bed in an area that is not high traffic will also increase her comfort level. As much as these dogs enjoy being around people, they also appreciate some peace.

The ideal place for your dog’s bed is in your room. Your dog will be close to you in a setting she associates with retiring for the day. She will be much happier when she can rest undisturbed.

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